La Crosse Public Library Archives Department


ARCHIVES
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The La Crosse Public Library Archives is full of resources for anyone interested in the history of the La Crosse area, as well as anyone researching their ancestors. Archives staff are available to assist with any questions you may have.

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New Hours starting July 10!

Monday-Friday 9-4
Saturday 9-1
Sunday 1-5  

Mission

The mission of the Archives and Local History Department of the La Crosse Public Library is to develop and promote a vital connection within the community between the past, present, and future by collecting, maintaining, and providing and promoting access to local historical and genealogical records.

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Architectural Styles and Revivals: The Colonial Revival

During the 1876 U.S. Centennial celebrations, the old argument that the United States needed an “American” architecture was resurrected, but what at first seemed clear-cut and definable, soon changed into another catch-all style. By 1876, the various revival styles and the pseudo-revivals were well-known and documented, but relatively little was known about house types before the revolution.

Architectural Styles and Revivals: The Queen Anne Style

This style, as developed and named by Richard Norman Shaw in England in the late 19th-century, claimed to be based on design elements used in the time of the English monarch Queen Anne. As the style moved to the United States, it lost many of medieval elements.

Architectural Styles and Revivals: The Second Empire Style

The Second Empire style features include the mansard roof with dormer windows, decorative brackets, columns, paired columns, half columns, triangular pediments, curved pediments, decorative window crests; the more complex, the better. Even though few examples of either remain, La Crosse had more Second Empire designs than most Midwestern communities.